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Monday, March 6, 2017

Comic: Kidnapped (Original by Tani)

We've been on a happy-go-lucky kick for a little while now, so let's take a step back into the land of grim and gritty crime drama.  Because Zootopia is both, and that's part of why we love it!

It's a situation we've seen many times before in fanfiction: Judy gets kidnapped, Nick has to figure out how to save her.  The scenario hasn't been done much in comics, though, so it's interesting to actually SEE how Nick reacts to such a potentially traumatizing event.  And boy, does he ever react.

Thanks to Tani for making the original comic, and to LMAbacus for translating and editing it!  Check out the original over on Pixiv, and the translated version after the break!  As usual for translated comics, read from right to left!



8 comments:

  1. Give that fox his tranq gun already! Therefore, after kicking a suspect unconscious, he can tranq the perp.

    Very important, especially with a suspect holding a firearm.

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    1. He can't negotiate with a gun in his hand unfortunately. He has to show he is unarmed.

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  2. I've seen the one which was translated by sunny4u and I prefer that dialogue over this one. Here, Nick describes Judy as a 'moron rabbit', a 'bothersome bunny' and as he is rescuing her, calls her a 'load'. So, not the Nick that I'm used to who really has a soft heart when it comes to his bunny. XD

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    1. Is there that much difference between "load to deal with" and "hard bunny to take [care] of"? Also, regarding "moron rabbit" versus "dumb bunny", Nick looks really angry in that panel, so I figured he was really upset at what she did.

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    2. LMAbacus, where'd you go bro? Shoot me a PM on discord when you get the chance!

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    3. Well, 'dumb bunny' is his term of endearment for her as can be seen in the movie. Moron seems more of an insult. As for the phrase, 'hard bunny to take care of', there is the implied message of his wanting to take care of her whereas 'load' implies a cross that he's not willing to bear.

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